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Chassis Sealing

ECrider

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Presume the IG will have a rust inhibitor and some sort of protection applied. Anyone got thoughts on applying another coat underneath/sills etc of something along the lines of Dinitrol or other such product.

As intend to keep the IG until I pop off it would seem a decent approach.
 

cheswick

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I’ll just be spraying lanolin underneath every few months. It looks like they’ve done a pretty good job from factory but the extra layer of protection can’t hurt I guess.
 

ECrider

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Sounds like a plan ?
 

WhiteBear

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In Germany the product is called Fluidfilm. I will have a look at the undercarriage of the Grenadier as soon as I get him and decide, which parts should be  treated.The car mechanics don‘t like Fluidfilm, it is a bit sticky. I think the dealers where we have to bring our cars for inspection will hate it, they sell  Maserati, Ferrari, BMW. Cars which are clean underneath. Presumably they will try to wash off the Fluidfilm before working on the car. BTW: anyone knows how much oil is needed for a change and of which specification?
 

rovie

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I had my Defender treated by Chris from Before 'n' after with Waxoyl rustproofing and KleenTect.
From my point of view, the best there is on the market. Fluidfilm and Mike Sanders are not comparable.

But I have looked at the frame of the Grenadier. The guys at INEOS Grenadier did a great job.
From my point of view, the three processes, electrocoating, powder coating and hot wax provide effective corrosion protection for the ladder frame. Both inside and out. I think, that I therefore do not need to apply any further corrosion protection.
 

ECrider

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Tks input Rovie ?
 

Clunster

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Insomniacs interested in how their Grenadier is being protected against tinworm might like this.

Flood waxing is devilishly technical and not my area but it might be worth checking compatibility with INEOS before firing up the compressor and squirting in the Dinitrol
 

DCPU

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In Germany the product is called Fluidfilm. I will have a look at the undercarriage of the Grenadier as soon as I get him and decide, which parts should be treated.The car mechanics donât like Fluidfilm, it is a bit sticky. I think the dealers where we have to bring our cars for inspection will hate it, they sell Maserati, Ferrari, BMW. Cars which are clean underneath. Presumably they will try to wash off the Fluidfilm before working on the car. BTW: anyone knows how much oil is needed for a change and of which specification?
Hope this. helpsGren oil.jpg
 

ChasingOurTrunks

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I was under the impression that both Fluid Film and WaxOil were essentially the same stuff with different viscosity, the fluid film being slightly more runny to allow easy spraying. Either way, in Canada we regularly have salted roads which wreak havoc on cars with regards to rust (depending on the province). I look to the guys that are out there in the worst of it, actually working on the roads when there's fresh salt -- the snow plow guys -- and they all swear by Fluid Film. Could be that WaxOil isn't as readily available in Canada.

But, in short, any lanolin-based rustproofer that doesn't set will work reasonably well. You want it to "self heal" (i.e. if a rock scrapes some of the wax off, you want it to "flow" back into the scrape). I intend to use a company called Rust Check that uses their own proprietary Lanolin-based rust proofing mix; it works really well.

The key thing is to get it done regularly - at least once a year. If you are doing a lot of highway driving in the wet, potentially more often than that (Fall and Spring ought to do it) as the speed + water makes a pressure washing effect that can rinse some of it off.
 

Clunster

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I was under the impression that both Fluid Film and WaxOil were essentially the same stuff with different viscosity, the fluid film being slightly more runny to allow easy spraying. Either way, in Canada we regularly have salted roads which wreak havoc on cars with regards to rust (depending on the province). I look to the guys that are out there in the worst of it, actually working on the roads when there's fresh salt -- the snow plow guys -- and they all swear by Fluid Film. Could be that WaxOil isn't as readily available in Canada.

But, in short, any lanolin-based rustproofer that doesn't set will work reasonably well. You want it to "self heal" (i.e. if a rock scrapes some of the wax off, you want it to "flow" back into the scrape). I intend to use a company called Rust Check that uses their own proprietary Lanolin-based rust proofing mix; it works really well.

The key thing is to get it done regularly - at least once a year. If you are doing a lot of highway driving in the wet, potentially more often than that (Fall and Spring ought to do it) as the speed + water makes a pressure washing effect that can rinse some of it off.
You want the waxes to be compatible and don't really want to add waxes that might create 'pooling' that ends up removing cover in high build areas. As I said it's complicated and a bit counter intuitive but maybe have a read about floodwaxing. 👍
 

ChasingOurTrunks

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You want the waxes to be compatible and don't really want to add waxes that might create 'pooling' that ends up removing cover in high build areas. As I said it's complicated and a bit counter intuitive but maybe have a read about floodwaxing. 👍
Totally agree -- that viscosity is critical. You need it "fluid" enough to self-heal, but firm enough to stay put with a decent protective layer on top, and not flow into pools. I will look more into it but that Flood Waxing seems to be more about application technique as opposed to product, and it's very similar to how Rust Chek does it here. They will actually do interior cavities via drilling holes the first time that are then plugged with rubber grommets for future applications. Then they stick a fancy wand up into the hold and flood the insides of doors, rocker panels, etc. It's minimally invasive and in many cases they don't even need to drill a hole as manufacturers already have them in there, but an extra $50 in cash to the person doing the job generally gets you a "dripping" vehicle afterwards (as in, the wax drips out of it for a few days, so you can be confident the interior cavities are reasonably well coated).

The oil itself is that mid-viscosity, flows-but-sticks texture. On exterior surfaces, like the frame or underside, it does eventually get "water/sand blasted" off by highway speeds as I mentioned, which is why re-application is a good idea. But, internal cavities likely do not need re-application (but it doesn't hurt to be through so I get them to do it anyway).

And, if you are keen, you can DIY this too. You can get hoses that will attach to the end of the FluidFilm canister specifically designed for internal cavities like frames, doors, rockers, etc. I did it myself. Once.

By the time I finished cleaning up, throwing out the clothes I ruined, and dealing with the mess in the driveway AND the insecurity as to whether or not I got everything I needed to -- well, let's just say all of a sudden $200 at RustChek became a bargain at twice the price!

Here's a good video comparing some different products:

 

Clunster

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Yes, my wife is a chemical engineer but when she tried to explain the technicals I drifted off! Before I started snoring I remember her stating how important it was to only to apply anti corrosion treatments when surfaces are bone dry which might be a struggle over here in a British winter 😫. Good luck
 
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